Blog

Blog
Copywriting vs. Content Writing: What’s the Difference?

Copywriting vs. Content Writing: What’s the Difference?

JS

While those within the writing/editing field may see this and think, “Duh, dude, I know this one,” many people out there don’t know the answer and use the terms more or less interchangeably.

What is content & what is copy?

In the world of words, “content” covers a multitude of things, including scripts, ebooks, journals, blog posts, white papers, technical guides, newsletters, guides, infographics, and more. The intent is more to educate, inform, or entertain, and the length depends on the needs of the piece.

“Copy” is used to refer specifically to writing with the intent to persuade. Sales ads, social media ads, commercials, slogans, landing pages, product pages, sales emails — copy is written to sell you something. It is persuasive writing, and typically the result is shorter.

While they have different purposes and intent, it is easy to remember it this way: Content is basically an umbrella term that covers all writing and word-related things. It can include copy as well, but in the writing world, most of us use the two distinctively — after all, words matter!

Think about “content creators” on social media. They are primarily using stories/scripts, videos, and images to share their lives. They are using the content from their lives to create physical content on the internet to both entertain their audience but ALSO to draw them in and get more followers.

In the writing industry, the two terms have specific meanings.

Example 1:

To put it simply, let’s say your company has a blog on its website and sends out weekly email newsletters to customers.

The content writer is coming up with topics, researching, finding credible sources and images, and writing blog posts for the blog portion of the site.

The copywriter writes the words on the website landing pages and creates an effective email newsletter to persuade subscribers to come to the website, read more, and spend money.

They are both words, but the purpose and intent differ — which requires a different set of skills.

Example 2:

Another example is a stand-up comedian. Their set is content, and the ads for the show are copy.

Basically,

Copy is persuasive, designed to make the reader take action (buy something, share something, sign up for something).

Content is broader and while it can include copy, also has all other manner of informative writing. Content is typically meant to educate, inform, or entertain.

As a note, since copywriting is more specialized, it tends to be higher paid. So, if you are thinking about becoming a copywriter — do it! Take some courses and learn in the ins and outs of copywriting and jump in with both feet!

Hope this helps!

How To Create A Schedule & Stop Working Weekends (for Freelancers)

How To Create A Schedule & Stop Working Weekends (for Freelancers)

Entrepreneur, JS

I am in several writing and freelancing groups on various platforms, including Facebook and LinkedIn.

I enjoy the community of other writers and seeing how others use software, how they approach issues with clients and more.

There are also a lot of newbies in those groups who have a ton of questions about finding clients, determining pricing, dealing with rejection, and scheduling.

I came across a GREAT question in one of the groups and really think it’s something many freelancers deal with. So here I am to give YOU this info!

Here is the question:

I have kept her name out for privacy’s sake.

Here is the answer I wrote to her:

It took me a while, but I learned to turn it off on weekends (unless I was under a deadline).

Here’s what you need to start doing: When you receive new work, whether from a new client or a current one, acknowledge receipt via email and ask when the deadline is.

Instead of just immediately starting, start having specific deadlines and then craft your workdays around them. If you have 3–4 weeks to dev edit a 50k-word draft, you know your pace and can start to set a schedule, such as “edit 10 pages per day” or “12,000 words per week,” etc. Build a schedule instead of just opening an email and starting work ASAP.

One thing that works for me is every single Monday morning, the first thing I do before starting any work is write down my to do list for the week. What projects need working on? Do I have any hard deadlines this week? Is there anyone I should be following up with? Any invoicing to do? I write a list by hand in a notebook I keep on my desk. Then I also have the pleasure of checking off things I complete “Edit 50 pages of X project — CHECK” or “Write press release and send to Y for review — CHECK.”

Having a visual list right in front of you that you can scratch out and add to as the week goes on, and then use it to push things forward to the next week as needed.

Let’s discuss this further.

When you first start freelancing, it’s easy to keep on top of everything. You’re typically not super busy yet, or haven’t put together a schedule yet, and can easily just check your email throughout the day.

You respond immediately to all new inquiries. When you get a new project, you jump right in and start working on it.

Maybe you have some organization and tools set up, maybe not.

Since the very beginning, I have used Google Drive to organize and house all of my projects. While these days I have to pay a bit (maybe $20 per year) for extra storage, that organization still works for me.

But you’re not super busy yet. And you probably haven’t really instituted a schedule.

Heck, maybe you’re still working from the couch or from bed!

Freelancing can be a full-time job — with a full-time salary.

But in most cases, that is because you treat it like a job. Like a business.

Don’t just do whatever whenever you feel like it.

  • Get on the phone with clients and discuss deadlines, deliverables, and payment terms.
  • Get a signed contract before starting ANY work. (Here is a copy of my contract you can use!)
  • Know your value, and don’t undersell yourself.
  • Set up a workspace in your home where you can work and be comfortable and focused.
  • SET SCHEDULES & REMINDERS.

I do not know how to tell you how important it is to have a schedule for work and deadlines!

I use my Google calendar to put down deadlines on the dates projects are due and then use my weekly physical checklist to list out specific tasks that need to be done that week. Every week is a new, fresh page, even if the previous list still has unchecked items. Those things get moved to the new page.

Set a reminder in your calendar to check in with clients and give them brief progress updates on the project. Mine is usually a brief email to let them know I am on track to meet the deadline, and then I include anything additional, like if I need more information, access to something, for them to review something, etc.

Let yourself rest on weekends! That email can wait until Monday; it is most definitely not a writing emergency — and even if it is, enjoy one of my favorite quotes:

“A lack of preparation on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.”

*chef’s kiss* what a beautiful sentiment. You’re allowed to stop working at a reasonable hour and not answer unexpected calls or emails at 10 pm!

If you TREAT freelancing as just “Oh, my side gig for a bit of extra cash,” then that’s all it might be.

But if you take it seriously and treat it like a job, even a part-time one, you are more likely to succeed faster.

So, find your rhythm. Create a schedule, make deadlines, organize your work and your space, and take weekends to yourself.

You’re going to do great!

9 Easy & FREE Marketing Ideas for People Who Hate Marketing

9 Easy & FREE Marketing Ideas for People Who Hate Marketing

Books, Copywriting, Editing, JS, LinkedIn, Medium, Sales & Marketing, writing

I get it, I am a weirdo.

Perhaps an anomaly.

But I…(shhh, don’t tell anyone!) like marketing myself and my business.

No, no, don’t run away!

I know most people hate marketing themselves.

It can feel “braggy” to talk about yourself. There is anxiety when approaching strangers. What if the person/company doesn’t like your work? And, hey, marketing takes time away from other (paid) work.

“I’m just not good at it.”

“I don’t see the point.”

I have HEARD IT ALL.

And I still know it to be 100% true that if you market yourself, even a little bit, you will get back SO MUCH return and will be more profitable and successful FASTER.

So, instead of a lecture on why marketing is super important and why you really just need to do it, full stop, I am going to give you a few quick tips you can implement starting right now to do some marketing with minimal work or effort on your part.

None of the below ideas require you to spend hours researching or scrolling through social media or emailing individual companies and people. They are all free. And even just picking a couple and trying them will show you how useful this kind of marketing can be.

I CHALLENGE YOU:

Do just a couple of these things consistently for 60–90 days and see if you are getting more leads, more money, and better clients. 

Just see if it works for you.

You may find that some things work better than others. Great! Drop the ones that don’t work after the first 30-60 days and focus on the things that are producing results. Maybe replace it with another item on the list if you have time to incorporate it.

You may be surprised that some of these end up being things you actually enjoy doing. Yes, I blog for my business — but I genuinely enjoy blogging!

1. Add your blog, books, and links to your email signature (and social bios).

Time it takes: 10 minutes (max)

Cost: Free

This is a super simple one. Add the links for your company, website, books, courses, etc. into your email signature and also into all of your social media bios.

It takes basically no time, and then they are there forever.

Here is my Gmail email signature:

2. Ask for referrals.

Time it takes: 10–20 minutes

Cost: Free

This is something you SHOULD be doing with every client, but it’s easy to forget.

Go through your spreadsheet or email folders or wherever and gather the list of previous clients you’ve worked with over the past, say two years.

Shoot them a super quick email saying hello and checking in, and letting them know you enjoyed working with them previously. Mention any exciting developments (you launched a new course, have new services, got married, etc.). And end it by saying, “If you or anyone you know anyone who needs _____ services, please let me know! I am currently looking to add 2 new clients to my roster. Thank you!”

You can even create a referral program where you give an old client $100 or a percentage of the first project you do with any client they refer.

If you decide to create a referral program, mention it in the same email!

Then, moving forward, every time you work with a client, ask for referrals. You don’t have to wait until you’re done working with someone. Once you’ve done some work for anyone, they have enough information to know they like working with you.

Always ask for referrals!

3. Upsell your existing clients for more services.

Time it takes: 10 minutes of conversation (or a REALLY good email)

Cost: Free

As a writer/editor, most first-time or prospective clients assume that writing or editing is all I do. They ask me about the cost of website copy, blogging, or editing a book, and that’s it.

However, I use the conversation to let them know about my other skills and other ways I can bring value to their business.

For example, instead of ONLY writing the blog post, I offer to source images, upload the post to their site (if they want), and create a social media post with the link, a quote from the article, and hashtags.

This takes a lot off their plate — uploading, scheduling posts, grabbing images, etc.

They then get excited when they realize I can do the entire process, which also helps them understand why my prices are what they are — because I’m worth it.

Or if I am editing for a client, I like to also offer my writing, fact-checking, research, and formatting services.

So, think about additional things you can do to make your existing services bigger. It is the easiest and fastest way to make more money!

If you offer graphic design and are brought on to update the website, talk about your logo creation services, too.

In most cases (in my experience), the client didn’t even think to ask if you also did these other things and are excited you can take more off their plate.

The result is more money from each client.

4. Create a free one-pager, article, infographic, 3-minute video, or other informational item related to your business.

Time it takes: 1–2 hours one time (+ long-term returns)

Cost: Free

This one and #5 work hand in hand.

You can offer a free opt-in item to anyone who is interested.

I’m sure you’ve seen plenty of popups on websites and blogs that say, “Get a FREE ____ workbook!” or “Click here to download a free 10-day meal plan!”

Those are free opt-ins.

You can create ANYTHING to be a free promo item. It could be a PDF of an article you wrote that is particularly valuable for your industry, a one-video short webinar on the topic you get asked about the most, a listicle of paid opportunities in your field, an infographic, a free ebook you’ve written — anything.

But having a free promo item helps you build your email list AND gets your name and work to a wider audience with basically no additional work from you.

Then you can add the link to your free promo item in your email signature and bios, at the end of blog posts, as a popup on your website. There are plugins for that OR you can do it via your mailing list site (see #5), and every time someone signs up for your free item, they are added to a mailing list and become leads.

5. Build an email list and send out newsletters.

Time it takes: 20 minutes to get started, then ongoing, maybe 30 minutes per newsletter

Cost: Free (depending on what resource you use)

I use a free MailChimp account for my email list and to send newsletters. If you choose a different service, this might not be free.

But MailChimp (and other email services) have free signup forms you can create and add to your website or blog to encourage people to sign up for your mailing list. In my MailChimp account, I can go to any audience and click on “Create a signup form” to get their form builder.

This is mine for my main mailing list, Schwartz Freelancer News

I have the link to my mailing list form (that “eepurl” URL at the top left) at the bottom of blog posts and on my website. You can also add it to your email signature, social media bios, and more.

Once I put it at the bottom of my blog posts, I started getting new signups every week!

Once you have a few signups, start sending out newsletters to your list. You choose how often you want to send them out and what they say. Do it consistently, similar to how you might create a blogging schedule.

I tend to only send out newsletters about once a month. I usually feature a recent (useful) blog post and mention what I am working on next and any announcements about my work or business.

Yours could be anything. They could be valuable resources you’ve found for people in your industry, a list of websites that pay for contributor articles, a recommended reading list, a recent blog post or video you posted, or anything!

But sending out newsletters keeps your name in peoples’ minds, engages with leads, and shows them the value you provide for free. They will be certain your paid services are worth your price.

6. Write and post blogs consistently.

Time it takes: 1–2 hours per blog

Cost: Free

Content marketing is super important, but all you need to know is that you should post more on your blog, whether that is on your website or on an independent platform like Medium.

Blogging consistently (I recommend at least once per week) will grow your audience and get you ranked higher in the search engine results pages (SERPs). Original content is huge for search engines.

And if more people find you from the SERPs, you’ll continue growing your audience and your credibility with useful content.

Bonus tip: Do some guest blogging! If you have a piece of content that could be a good fit on another site, shoot them an email and ask if they accept guest posts. Whether they pay or not, you’re widening your audience base and getting your name further afield.

7. Post on social media more often (& not necessarily work stuff!).

Time it takes: 5–10 minutes a couple of days a week

Cost: Free

You have an online business. You KNOW you should be using social media, even just a little bit every week.

Start making a point to post on social media 2–3 times per week. The posts do not need to be only about your business. In fact, most consumers prefer to see the humanity and authenticity behind the brand. Post about yourself, a cute photo of your pet, a challenge you are working through, anything.

Posting more often widens your reach and expands who sees you. And then, when they check your bio, they see all the stuff you do! It all works together.

Make sure to use hashtags when posting so that the people who follow those tags see your posts, and remember it doesn’t even have to be original content — you can retweet and share other people’s content. Tag them so their audience sees you, too.

Finally, don’t sleep on LinkedIn. I’ve gotten a bunch of clients through LinkedIn. Grab the post you just made on Facebook or Twitter and paste it into LinkedIn to share. Throw up a blog post from your blog onto LinkedIn’s platform occasionally. Just use it; there are so many business owners on that platform!

8. Get involved in a couple of Facebook or LinkedIn groups in your field of expertise and answer a few questions.

Time it takes: 10 minutes a couple of times per week

Cost: Free

You’re probably already in a few groups here and there for your industry. I am in a couple of writing groups on Facebook and LinkedIn. While I don’t check them every day, I do like to go in once or twice each week and answer some questions.

I have gotten new clients who told me they saw my comments in the FB/LI group and wanted to work with me.

I just answer questions with a few sentences. Not every day and not every question, but I go in and clearly answer a few things weekly to show my authority and continue to brand myself as a thought leader.

I am also not afraid to ask a question or two myself in the group and get some info from others.

It’s a great way to engage with people and get your name out without having to actively market yourself. It also shows off your knowledge and expertise. Win-win!

9. Join HARO & PodcastGuests to get featured in articles and podcasts.

Time it takes: 2–3 minutes to scroll through the list. 3-5 minutes per answer

Cost: Free

I’ve talked about HARO before, and I’m saying it here because it’s a great way to get free publicity and market yourself by getting quoted by other websites for free.

HARO stands for Help A Reporter Out and is at www.HelpAReporter.com. Go to the website and sign up as a “source.” It’s free and quick.

You will receive 3 emails per day from HARO with a list of all the writers and reporters looking for information and quotes for their articles. They always list out what they are looking for and the information they need, and in most cases, they list the publication.

If they like your response, they’ll quote you in the article and usually send you a link once it is published.

In case they don’t, I do a Google search of my name about once a month to see if anything new has been posted with my name.

If you’re interested in getting on podcasts, a similar free resource to HARO for podcasts is podcastguests.com. Sign up and you’ll receive daily emails about podcasts actively looking for people to interview on their show. You can very quickly fill out a Google form for each one you’re interested in.

Not only is this a great free way to get your name even further out there and pops up when people search your name, but it ALSO is a great addition to the Media page on your website. My media page lists everywhere I have been featured or directly interviewed, including podcasts. It just adds to my credibility when people look at my website and search for me online.

Here’s my media page: https://jyssicaschwartz.com/media/

An Important Note:

James M. Ranson, a close friend of mine who is also a successful freelancer, wants to add his thoughts to this post. This comes directly from his own experience:

If you look at these 9 marketing tips and just don’t want to do any of them or don’t see the point in doing them, you may not have a marketing issue — you may have a business problem. Take some time to reflect and make sure that you are happy with what you do and offer and the work you produce. Revisit what you do, why you do it, who you do it for, and how you feel about doing it.

If you aren’t excited to share it, you may not be doing the thing that is right for you. And that’s ok! It’s totally fine — even encouraged — to reassess and pivot to a new offering or work that you like more.

Be ruthlessly honest with yourself about what’s working for you around those things and what isn’t. Then use what you find to tweak, refine, pivot, or even completely revamp your business into something you’re excited to do at least SOME of these 9 marketing tasks for.

Do You Really Have To Write Every Day To Make Money?

Do You Really Have To Write Every Day To Make Money?

Entrepreneur, JS, writing

There is a myth that pervades the writing world that you HAVE to write every single day.

If you don’t, then you won’t be successful or good…or make money!

That is NOT true.

Let’s talk about this.

While I have long thought, written, and advised that writing more often is essential to improving, the main thing anyone can take away from my advice is:

CONSISTENCY.

Consistency is the true path to success.

I do not write every day.

Not on my blog, for my next book, or in my journal.

Depending on my clients and deadlines, not even for clients! (To be fair, I mostly do editing these days.)

Consistency is the only real way to create a sustainable, profitable writing career.

Some writers may prefer a writing schedule that has them writing every day. But that is certainly not the only way to be successful.

I post on my Medium blog once each week. Sometimes more than once, if I am struck by a good idea.

But I strive to always post one new blog per week.

Not because I cannot write more but because that is a schedule and expectation I can actually meet every single week.

When I’ve tried to commit to more than that in the past, it will be okay for a few weeks, but then I get busy or run out of ideas or hit writer’s block or don’t feel like writing that day, and I stop.

A sustainable writing schedule is more important (to me) than money right this moment.

When I’m working on a new book (I’ve written 6!), my goal is not to finish it right this moment and get it away from me — my goal is to actually write a good book.

And I know myself well enough to know that a daily several-hour writing commitment is not going to happen. I might try for a couple of days, but that will quickly lead to burnout for me.

I’ll get bored of it and just chuck the proverbial ball into the shed and ignore it until I kind of lose passion for the topic.

Instead, I create a sustainable writing schedule that I can actually stick to and continue with over time.

Building a profitable writing business is always a longer-term goal, not an overnight implementation.

Listen, I got clients right away when I started freelancing. Meaning I started making money ASAP.

But if I’d stopped there and didn’t continue to market my business, refine my offerings, raise my prices, and improve my skills, I would not have been able to continue.

Because those first few clients paid me peanuts! I didn’t know what to charge, I was saying yes to any project that came along, and I allowed clients to scope creep.

Because I hadn’t figured it all out yet.

I HAD to take a longer view. Raising my prices and knowing my worth. Putting a contract in place with revision limits. Figuring out the things I LIKED doing and no longer doing the things I didn’t enjoy.

My business has evolved significantly over the years.

I no longer even offer weekly blogging! I mainly do editing work these days and very little actual writing for clients.

But it all takes time.

And consistency.

Consistently giving clients high-quality work products.

Consistently marketing myself.

Consistently asking for referrals.

Consistently providing top-notch customer service to clients.

Consistently valuing my time and not over-committing or under-charging.

Consistently producing personal writing on a schedule that works for me.

…consistently making money and running a profitable business.

Branding vs. Marketing vs. Sales

Branding vs. Marketing vs. Sales

Copywriting, Entrepreneur, Medium, Sales & Marketing

When it comes to branding and entrepreneurship as a whole, authenticity is often far more important than any “sales tactics” or marketing plans.

Those things are also incredibly important — essential for businesses to thrive, in fact.

Let’s first take a look at the concepts

Branding

Branding is “the promotion of a particular product or company by means of advertising and distinctive design.”

Basically, branding is how you and your company are presented to the world. Your name, logo, color choices, fonts, banners, mascots, etc.

Your branding is a marketing tool and is what allows your company to stand out from the competition. When done right, it helps build trust and even support your mission and vision as a business.

Think about the Nike swoosh — I don’t have to put an image; you know exactly what I’m talking about. No matter where you see it or if it has text with it, you know exactly what brand it represents.

Marketing

Marketing “refers to activities a company undertakes to promote the buying or selling of a product, service, or good.”

In other words, marketing is really what you’re using the branding FOR. For example, doing a paid ad campaign on social media or sending an email blast to your list.

You use your branding to make your marketing strategies cohesive and recognizable.

Almost anything can be a marketing tool, a driver of traffic to your product or service.

As an example, (some of) the books I’ve written are marketing tools for my writing and editing business. I write about freelancing and books and writing, therefore, people who read them understand that I am knowledgeable about the subject and might reach out to me to hire me.

Your social media accounts, especially those tied directly to your business, are marketing tools. You use them to announce new products, give information, and engage with your audience.

Sales

Sales is “a transaction between two or more parties in which the buyer receives tangible or intangible goods, services, or assets in exchange for money. … Regardless of the context, a sale is essentially a contract between the buyer and the seller of the particular good or service in question.”

Essentially, a sale is a short-term, sometimes one-time interaction. It is transactional in nature.

But marketing is a longer-term, more relationship-based activity. Sure, it exists to drive sales, but that is not its only purpose. It is meant to engage with your target market, promote the company, build relationships, and advertise the services/goods.

How does authenticity come into play?

Authenticity is imperative in today’s world.

With the advent of the internet and how connected we are, the world has become a smaller place. Customers can easily look up any company and learn about its business practices, mission, social impact, how they treat employees, and so much more.

Customers are smart — and they have more options than ever before.

If customers don’t like how you do business, there are a dozen other companies they can turn to.

And if they don’t trust you, they will not buy from you.

Authenticity is being real and genuine. For businesses, it often goes hand-in-hand with transparency, integrity, sincerity, and building genuine relationships with your customers.

No matter how beautiful your branding or masterful your marketing, without authenticity, you cannot reach the success you want.

If you want to stand out, you must figure out how to be authentic.

And it needs to be real.

Customers will see through fake authenticity.

Think about it — do you trust Facebook?

Probably not. They have had too many issues with data, privacy, and gobbling up the competition.

Sure, you might still use it, but you’re not an advocate of the brand, and it’s all too easy for you to bash it, even on its own platform!

What are some signs of fake authenticity?

  • Not delivering on promises your business makes. If your customers are not getting the quality they expect, are missing pieces of the product, or are unable to get a promised refund, etc., how can they believe you care about your product or your customers?
  • Pretending you/your business is perfect. Perfection is highly overrated — most customers would rather see reality than an airbrushed image of perfection. And since most people don’t trust perfection, you will lose customers.
  • Companies that claim they have a social mission but are unable to prove it.
  • Companies that only support certain groups or say they are allies during the month it is celebrated — Black History Month, Pride Month, etc. If you only post a picture of a rainbow cookie in June but never support LGBTQIA+ the rest of the year, we notice. Allyship shouldn’t be just a marketing tool or performative.
  • The same goes for gender and minority equality. You can say you support it, but if you have 2% female or POC leadership and a wage gap — then you don’t.
  • Fake before and after shots or dramatically photoshopped images.

Authenticity in Marketing

Those were some ways companies come off as not genuine or real. But how do you show your authenticity in marketing and on social media?

The answer is both simple and complex: be yourself, be honest, and have fun.

Companies are neither perfect nor relatable. PEOPLE are relatable and real.

Instead of going for polished perfection, aim for human and genuine.

Look at the way some major corporations have let their social media managers have fun and be human and silly.

https://twitter.com/Wendys

Take a look at some of the small business creators on TikTok that have gained huge followings just by being themselves — they talk about the highs and lows of owning a business, share trials and triumphs, and above all, show themselves as human.

@ktscanvases, @jenonajetplane, @lindatongplanners, @belexieshoppe, @modernyarn, and genuinely so many more.

Larger businesses can follow the same template: show your work, show yourself, and be honest.

Highlight employees, show any social impact projects you’re involved in, and discuss the challenges and successes of your business.

When it comes to authenticity, it is NOT a “fake it ’til you make it” process. It’s the opposite — be real ’til you grow.

Be authentic, and success will follow.

How To Self-Publish Your Book on Amazon KDP

How To Self-Publish Your Book on Amazon KDP

Books, Medium

I get asked how to self-publish ALL the time.

And I know it can be confusing if you’ve never done it before. So to make it easier, I’ve created a step by step guide for the entire process.

I am not going to dive into how to find a cover designer or formatting or all the details of formatting in this post. Let me know if that is something you want to see in another article.

Here are the things you need to self-publish on Amazon:

  • Two versions of your formatted book; one as a docx, EPUB, or KPF file (formatted for ebook) and the other as a PDF file (formatted for the physical version/paperback).
  • Front cover in JPG format (for ebook) and wraparound cover with a spine in JPG format (for physical version/paperback).
  • Summary/book description (same as what is on the back cover of the physical book).
  • An idea of the two Amazon categories you want to publish in.
  • The price you want to sell the ebook and paperback versions for.

You do not need to buy an ISBN, Amazon will provide you with one for free for each version.

Step 1: Create an account on KDP.

Go to kdp.amazon.com and sign in with your same Amazon login.

My homepage on KDP.

The “Bookshelf” tab is where you upload books and also see a list of all books you’ve published.

The “Reports” tab shows how many books have been sold in each format and your current royalties, as well as how many Kindle Unlimited pages are read. There is other info as well. You can just click through the tabs to familiarize yourself.

The “Community” tab has forums and a knowledge base, and the “Marketing” tab shows advertising options through Amazon.

Step 2: Upload an ebook.

On the “Bookshelf” tab, click +Kindle eBook.

You will now see 3 pages of steps to publish your ebook. Let’s go through them one by one.

Kindle eBook Details

This is the page where you’ll input all the book details.

Start by typing in your book title and subtitle (if any). If you don’t have a subtitle, leave this blank.

If your book is part of a series, you will do the series step. If not, skip it.

If you are publishing a new book, then you will not fill in the edition number. This is only if it is a new or updated version of an existing, already published book.

Add your name as author.

If you have an illustrator, editor, co-author, introduction writer, or any other contributors, add their names and role under “Contributors.”

Next, you will add the book description in the text box.

Check off that you own the copyright to your book.

Select up to 7 keywords or keyphrases that describe your book. These can be anything you want but should be related to your book’s topic and themes. These keywords help Amazon know when to show your book when shoppers search for related topics.

Now you will select 2 categories. These are the categories your book will be listed in on Amazon’s book listings.

You can choose any categories you want. Take your time to go through the various options and categories to see what makes the most sense. You can only choose 2.

In the next section, if you’re uploading a children’s book, you can select age and grade ranges. If it is not a kid’s book, skip this step.

If you plan to upload the book ASAP, ignore the pre-order option.

Click Save and Continue.

Kindle eBook Content

This is the page where you will upload your manuscript and cover, as well as actually see what it will look like.

At the top, you will need to select if you want to enable Digita Rights Management (DRM). This is up to you. Here are 3 resources that go deeper into details on what DRM is and the pros and cons so you can decide:

Next, you’ll upload your book manuscript as a docx, EPUB, or KPF file. If it is a docx file, it still needs to be formatted correctly for Kindle.

Then you’ll upload your front cover image (not the wraparound cover) as a JPG or TIFF file. You could use the cover creator to create a cover on your own, though I have not used that tool.

Once the interior and covers are fully uploaded and processed, click on Launch Previewer to see how it will look!

It is important to flip through this and make sure the cover looks good, the interior pages look right, and that KDP doesn’t flag any issues. At the top of the screen, you can change the previewer to Tablet, Phone, or Kindle e-reader to see what your book will look like on various devices.

It is common for the sizing or formatting to be slightly off. Read the menu on the left side to get details if something isn’t right and give that information to your cover designer and/or formatter for any needed adjustments. You’ll take the adjusted files and reupload them in this same place and review the previewer again.

If you are satisfied with everything, click Approve.

Last on this page is the ISBN. If you have already purchased an ISBN, paste it here. If not, skip this step, as ebooks do not require one.

Click Save and Continue.

Kindle eBook Pricing

Last is the pricing page.

You’ll start by selecting if you want to enroll in KDP Select. KDP Select gives you access to promotions and other things but is a 90-day requirement that will auto-renew unless you remember to change it. Here are 3 resources to decide if you want to enroll:

For territories, you can choose if you want to have your book sold in all Amazon territories around the world or if you prefer to limit it to specific areas.

Under Primary marketplace, you can select your “home” Amazon. For example, if you are in the US, this will be Amazon.com. If you are located in India, it would be Amazon.in.

Then comes pricing! Here you will choose either 35% or 70% royalty. If you want the 70% royalty, your book MUST be priced between $2.99 and $9.99.

With 35%, your price can be anywhere from $0.99 to $200.

You will see the converted priced and royalties per sale for all territories below.

Finally, you’ll see the Book Lending section. If you choose 70% royalties, you will automatically be enrolled in Book Lending and cannot remove it.

Click Publish.

Congrats! Your ebook is submitted. You will receive an email within 72 hours from Amazon KDP either telling you the book is live and giving you the link OR explaining any issues and telling you what to fix before it can go live.

Step 3: Upload a paperback.

Now that you have uploaded your ebook, it’s time to do the paperback. Once you hit “Publish” for the ebook, KDP will give you a popup pop that asks if you want to go ahead and do the paperback. Click yes.

If you did not see the popup or accidentally clicked no, simply click +Paperback in the center of the “Bookshelf” screen.

Paperback Details

If you clicked yes on the popup, KDP will autofill in this information from the ebook details. Verify it is correct and change anything you need.

Save and Continue to move onto the content.

If you clicked +Paperback, it will not autofill the Paperback Details page and you’ll need to fill it in with the same information from the ebook: title, author, description, keywords, categories, etc. before you save and continue.

Paperback Content

At the top, you will see the ISBN section.

If you purchased your own ISBN, click “Use my own ISBN” and paste in the number. If not, select “Get a free KDP ISBN” and the system will randomly assign you one.

Under publication date, you can choose any date starting from today. If you have a specific date you want to launch, find and select that day. If not, just put today’s date.

The next section is Print Options.

In the top area, you’ll select whether you want a black and white interior with cream or white paper or a color interior. Keep in mind that black and white is cheaper to print, giving you more royalties from each sale.

Then you’ll see Trim Size. Trim size is the size of your physical book. You will have already chosen this size when you had a cover made and the interior formatted, so you should already know this. The cover and interior have to be formatted to fit your specific book/trim size.

KDP supports a ton of different sizes. Here’s a full list of sizes you can choose from. 5×8 and 6×9 seem to be very common.

You’ll also choose if you want bleed or no bleed. Bleed is when the background color or images go all the way to the edge of the page, no bleed means it does not extend to the edge and has a small border on all sides.

Select if you want your cover to be matte or shiny.

Next, just like with the ebook, it’s time to upload your manuscript and cover. Manuscripts can be PDF (recommended), docx, HTML, or RTF.

Upload your wraparound cover as a PDF file.

Launch the previewer, review, and approve. Take note if there are any issues, as you’ll need to resolve them before it will let you publish the book.

Paperback Rights & Pricing

This page is the same as the ebook pricing page. Choose your territories, marketplace, and your pricing. Generally, paperbacks cost more than ebooks.

Finally, click Publish Your Paperback Book.

Congrats! Wait for the email from Amazon with a live link or any issues.

After You Publish

AFTER your first book is live on Amazon, you’ll go to Author Central to create an Amazon author page.

Step 1: Go to author.amazon.com and create an account and fill in your profile info.

Step 2: Click “Books” at the top to add your books to your profile page. Here is what my profile page looks like: https://www.amazon.com/~/e/B074MBKFZN

Every single time you upload a new book, you’ll go to Author Central and add it to your page.

You will also need to contact Author Central’s customer service to have them merge your ebook and paperback into one page. If you don’t, Amazon counts them as separate books and each version will have its own page. You want them to be on one page so you can see all formats in one place.

If you need more detail on Author Central, here is a step-by-step guide with images: 3 Steps You Must Take After Publishing Your Book

And you’re all set!

I know this is long but I hope it’s super helpful. Let me know if you have any questions!


Check out my book Concept to Conclusion: How to Write a Book and learn everything you need to know to conceive of, outline, write, publish, and market a book! Or check out my newest release, an anxiety journal: But…what if? A Journal For Anxious People.

Sign up for my mailing list for writing and freelancing news and information.

Other stories you may like:

24 Ways To Market & Sell Your Book

24 Ways To Market & Sell Your Book

Books, JS, Sales & Marketing

Use your book as a marketing tool to grow your business!

Few authors make a livable income from selling their books alone (including me!). However, there are many ways having written a book allows you to make more money, by attracting new clients, growing your business or brand, and positioning yourself as an authority — which will lead to you raising your prices for your services.

You may come to see that writing your book is the easy part, and it’s the marketing and selling it which can be difficult and sometimes frustrating.

Using your book as a marketing tool to serve yourself and your business, and marketing your book to sell copies are two separate things and you should approach them differently.

An example of using your book as a marketing tool is if you use the fact that you’re a published author in the industry as a selling point or credential to land a speaking engagement.

An example of marketing your book for sales is bringing copies of your book to a conference, book fair, or speaking engagement and selling copies to attendees while there.

Marketing your book can sometimes feel like a second job, but it’s an important aspect in book publishing, no matter how you choose to publish! If you go with traditional publishing, the publisher will have ways to market your book, but it will still be up to you to do a lot of your own marketing, too.

Having written a book allows you to:

  • Launch or further your personal brand (or that of your company).
  • Position yourself as a thought leader and an expert in your field.
  • Give yourself an immediate perception of authority, credibility, and legitimacy.
  • Attract clients and act as a lead generator, which helps you sell more products or services.
  • Provide a straightforward way to educate people on your industry or topic.
  • Create a passive income stream.
  • Launch or grow a business.
  • Provide more opportunities for media and publicity.
  • Open doors for getting into public speaking or consulting.

24 Book Marketing Ideas

Here is a list of 24 marketing ideas. Hopefully, this list will spark some ideas and inspiration in you and you may come up with new ideas I’d never think of!

  • Create an opt-in within your book to add to your mailing list (see chapter six for more on this).
  • Use HARO and PodcastGuests to be featured in articles and podcasts.
  • Run a preorder campaign before you launch.
  • Create a Goodreads account and connect your book to your name there.
  • Write an article on LinkedIn.
  • Write a blog post on your personal blog.
  • Do some guest posts on other people’s blogs.
  • Announce your book to your email lists.
  • Update your website with your new book and a link to purchase.
  • Create targeted ads on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
  • Run a Google AdWords campaign.
  • Write and distribute a press release.
  • Do livestreams on Facebook or YouTube with Q&As and talk about your book and the writing process
  • Do a Reddit AMA (“Ask Me Anything”).
  • Host a book launch party.
  • Do book signings at local bookstores or libraries.
  • Make simple graphics on sites like Canva to post on various social media platforms.
  • Submit your book to websites that do editorial reviews.
  • Send your book to individual reviewers who post on their own platforms.
  • Put an excerpt of a chapter or two on Wattpad and include a link to purchase the rest.
  • Do a giveaway.
  • Try a Kindle Countdown deal (price promotion) or use other Amazon promotional tools available to you through KDP (if you enrolled in KDP Select).
  • Be a speaker at an event or conference (and bring copies of your book to sell).
  • Attend book fairs, festivals, and conferences (you can even purchase a booth and bring plenty of copies to sell).

Get creative and think about how you can get your book or information about you in front of a wider audience. These are only some of the ways you can market and advertise your book, and I know you’ll be able to come up with many more.

It’s up to you whether you choose to use your book as a marketing tool or market your book at all. Just know that being a published author can serve you well in your life and business.

Check out my book Concept to Conclusion: How to Write a Book and learn everything you need to know to conceive of, outline, write, publish, and market a book! Or check out my first-ever beautifully illustrated kid’s book I Love You Bigger Than All The Stars In The Sky.

Sign up for my mailing list for writing and freelancing news and information.

Other stories you may like:

3 Steps You Must Take After Publishing Your Book

How To Write & Publish A Kid’s Book

What Is ‘Creative Nonfiction’?

17 Mistakes To Avoid As A Freelancer

17 Mistakes To Avoid As A Freelancer

Books, Copywriting, Entrepreneur, JS, Medium

A straightforward list of tips and advice to build your brand fast.

I saw this question on Quora and wrote up a nice long answer. I realized it would be useful to you as well! So here is my answer to “What should I avoid when I am a freelance writer?” originally asked on Quora with some more information for you.

There were some other excellent answers, but here are the 17 mistakes that I came up with and some details as to why.

The top things to avoid as a freelance writer are:

  • Working for free for any reason — you do not need a portfolio of published pieces or free work to get started. Anyone with any level of experience can pitch to clients and use PDFs or Google docs of written pieces as writing samples. Never work for free. 
  • Self-doubt — Insecurity, imposter syndrome, and self-doubt are extremely common, especially among new or inexperienced freelancers. The reality is that if people are willing to pay for your work, then it is valuable. You have to value yourself and your skills and be confident in your pitches to succeed. Entrepreneurship is hard enough without self-sabotage.
  • Working for very low pay — If a site or agency or client is offering 2 or 4 cents per word, no matter how fast you write, it is too low and unreasonable. Value your skills and time. If you are making at or below even minimum wage, it’s WAY TOO LOW. Freelance writing is a specialized skill, especially if you have a specific highly specialized niche. Charge more and say NO to too-low wages. Use that time looking for higher-paying projects.
  • Writing free “samples” — If a company or client asks for free writing, it’s a scam to get free posts. Even if they are a legitimate company, they are still scamming you. Reputable good companies will pay for any samples or tests they ask you to do in the interview process.
  • Bad clients — Clients who try to scope creep (asking for more than you agreed to and are being paid for), demanding, late with payments, nickel-and-diming you, and who are unresponsive are simply not worth your time and frustration. Spend that time looking for better clients. Trust me, this one is huge. Here’s a post about how to identify these types of bad clients.
  • Freelance content mills — I personally am not a fan of Upwork and similar sites, simply because it always feels like a race to the bottom. Value quantity over quality. Marketing yourself can sound overwhelming but if you pick a few companies that look like good fits and reach out directly, you are far more likely to get a response and start building a relationship.
  • Overbooking yourself — If you overload yourself with work, you risk missing deadlines, stressing yourself out, and making mistakes. Know your limits of how much you can do in a day, a week, and a month. It is ok to say “I am not able to take that on this week but I could start on it next Tuesday with a deadline of Friday if that works for you.” Give yourself permission to take a break, a nap, a walk, and have some free time. Freelancing doesn’t mean being busy every second, it’s about working smarter and building relationships, and working on the types of things you WANT to be doing.
  • Missing deadlines — Don’t do it. If you make a commitment, make it happen. If you overbooked yourself or didn’t allow enough time for it, then grind it out and do it this time and learn the lesson of how long things take you and how to estimate deadlines. When creating your deadlines, build in some wiggle room.
  • Working without a contract — This is a huge no-no. Don’t do it. Even if it is a simple, relatively inexpensive project, contracts are hugely important. Your contract should dictate payments, deadlines, deliverables, and anything else having to do with the client/freelancer relationship. Contracts are put in place to protect ALL parties, not just the freelancer. The client is getting a guarantee of the work and deliverables they can expect, as well as timelines and payment schedules.
  • Not asking for referrals and reviews/testimonials — This is a mistake many freelancers make. They either “feel weird asking” or forget to ask for referrals and testimonials. Not me! I assume that every client I work with had a good experience — because I put a lot of effort into making sure I am easy to work with and give them what they ask for. After our project is complete, I let them know I enjoyed working with them and ask if they or anyone they know needs any writing and editing services. If they write back a good review, I ask if it’s ok to put it up on my website.
  • Not looking for long-term or retainer clients — This is one many freelancers learn as they go. Projects are great and especially good for filling gaps and making faster money, but longer-term projects and monthly retainer clients are the best way to build stability into your paycheck and work. I have retainer clients that pay a flat fee per month and get X number of hours or work or X number of posts per month from me. I invoice them monthly and build a solid relationship. I also tend to get more referrals from this type of client.
  • Not asking for more money/negotiating — If a project or client seems interesting and you want to work with them but they are offering too low of pay rates, try simply asking for and negotiating for more money. It never hurts to ask. I often will take a little time to educate them on “average” rates and why they often get what they pay for. I show them my value and the benefits they will get from working with me. This works more often than not.
  • Not be proactive about pitching/marketing yourself — Many new (and seasoned!) freelancers join sites like Upwork and write for their own blogs and just wait for clients to come to them. This is the worst possible strategy. Being successful faster requires you to go out and identify ideal clients and actively reach out to them and introduce yourself. No one knows who I am. They are not searching for ME, they are searching for a random writer to fit with what they need. Being proactive is extremely effective and often results in better clients, better work, and better pay.
  • Not having their own blog — Having your own blog that you update regularly is a huge boon. People can find you organically and you can also use it as your writing samples. It is a great way to get your name out there and build an audience. Some clients will reach out to you simply because they found your blog and it was a great resource for them.
  • Not diversifying their income — You do NOT have to stick to one thing. Maybe you started out ghostwriting blog posts, but that doesn’t mean that is the only thing you can do. There are tons of other ways to make money, some more passive than others. For example, you can write a book and get royalties from sales, you can do some affiliate marketing if it makes sense on your blog, you can start a podcast or a Youtube channel, you could create a short webinar or online course that can be sold in perpetuity.
  • Not starting an email list early — I didn’t start my email list until I was ready to publish my first book and I was definitely missing out. Newsletters can make you money, make you a thought leader, let you give valuable information to your readers, and is a great place to announce new things happening with you — book releases, a new service offering, and more.
  • Not double-checking the details — When writing or editing something for anyone, make sure you not only reread your work several times but also that you reread the brief or outline to make sure it is what the client wants. Also, run your work through editing software like Grammarly as a final step, just to make sure you didn’t miss anything. We all make mistakes and typos, it’s human nature. So, just do whatever you can to avoid them in the final product.

I hope you find this helpful and can avoid making these mistakes as you build your freelancing empire!


Check out my book Concept to Conclusion: How to Write a Book and learn everything you need to know to conceive of, outline, write, publish, and market a book! Or check out my first-ever beautifully illustrated kid’s book I Love You Bigger Than All The Stars In The Sky.

Sign up for my mailing list for writing and freelancing news and information.


Other stories you may like:

Have a Free Freelancer Contract Template

How To Make Money As A Freelance Writer

24 Ways To Market & Sell Your Book

21 Ways to Spark Your Creativity in 2021

21 Ways to Spark Your Creativity in 2021

JS, Medium, writing

What to do when the Creativity Well runs dry.

As a writer, sometimes I just don’t have a great idea.

We’ve all been there. Artists and sculptors and designers and architects — any profession that requires creative ideas — have had times when they hit a wall.

In writing, it’s simply called “writer’s block.” A simple, clear phrase that indicates a brick wall in my brain between “I want/need to write” and “I have no idea what to write.”

But creativity is not a waterfall. It is not continuous. Creativity is more like a river. It moves, changes directions and shoots off down a tributary, it ebbs and flows, it rises and falls.

Creativity, like water, is powerful.

It’s a driving force inside us that makes us want to create.

To make something.

Whether it’s a simple blog post, a new sticker design, a paint by number, or Michaelangelo’s David.

Creativity can sometimes be forced. Like anything in life, sometimes you don’t know the end result but you just have to start something.

Here are 21 ways you can shake off the block, dance past the wall, and spark your creativity:

  • Set a timer. Turn off all distractions, set a timer for 5 minutes, and write or draw the first thing that comes to mind. It doesn’t matter what it is! Let the pen move and see what happens.
  • Get outside. Just take a walk and clear your mind. Go outside, get some fresh air, and let yourself breathe. Stop focusing so hard and trying to force an idea and just enjoy a nice walk. You’ll be surprised what sparks in your head when you stop trying to force yourself to be creative and give yourself a break.
  • People watch! This is one of my favorites. I like to look out the window or go to the park and just watch strangers go by. Sometimes I make up stories about where they are going or what they do, who they are, why they are in a rush. It’s a really nice way to pass some time and let creativity come in.
  • Just dance! Sometimes we need to get out of a rut and shake it off. Especially with the pandemic, we’re moving less and staying in more. Put on some upbeat music and shake it out. Move your body and shake and shimmy and gyrate and sing along and just enjoy the music. Get your heart rate up and your let your body move!
  • Go drive. Much like taking a walk, often just removing yourself from where you are will change how you think and help remove creative blocks. Go drive through an area you haven’t before, go anywhere and just enjoy the open road.
  • Read a book. I know, you should be working and it feels lazy to take a break and do something fun like reading when you really should be getting shit done. But give your brain a break! Read something you enjoy, not a nonfic about how to be creative…let your brain relax!
  • Meditate. Some people find meditation to be very relaxing and allow them to reset and revitalize. Breathe!
  • Browse social media. I do this with Facebook and Quora. I will just scroll through and see what people are talking about. What questions are they asking? What are they thinking about? Seeing what others are talking about often sparks ideas in me. Pinterest is another great one to look through.
  • Browse the news. Don’t just doom-scroll and go into a spiral, but run through the headlines. What is happening in the world or in your area right now? Often, seeing what’s going on will spark something in your brain and that will thread out and become a great idea.
  • Think like a kid. If you don’t have a kid handy to chat with, think about what you were like as a child. Look at pictures, think about what you wanted to be when you grew up, what you enjoyed doing as 5, 10, and 15 years old. Let yourself wander down memory lane.
  • Talk to a friend. Get out of your head and onto a call or video chat with someone you love. You don’t need to talk about the lack of creativity — just enjoy spending quality time with someone you love!
  • Do some decluttering! Is there anything more peaceful and beautiful than an organized and clean space? Pick one area — your desk, your dresser, the kitchen pantry, the coffee table — and declutter. Clean up, organize, Marie Kondo the crap out of the area. Then wipe it all down and bask in your new-feeling space.
  • Buy a new tool. What I mean is to buy something that relates to your creative outlet. A new pen or notebook (we writers ADORE journals and notebooks) for a writer, a new brush or paint set for painters, a new set of markers, a sculpting tool, anything. It doesn’t have to be expensive — think how you feel every time you open a new pen/brush/marker. It feels so good and you want to use it ASAP!
  • Ask for help. Don’t be afraid to ask people what’s on their mind or what they would draw/write/make! Tap into other people’s creativity and let the ideas flow.
  • Change the scenery. Take yourself somewhere else. A change in environment is a great way to revitalize your brain. Go to a coffee shop, take your stuff to the backyard, or just move to a different room than where you normally work. Shake up the scenery and think differently.
  • Change the story. If you always paint flowers and it’s just not feeling right today, try painting a dinosaur. If you write nonfiction and blogs, try writing a short fictional story. If you always make mugs, make a little penguin. Get out of the rut by forcing yourself to think differently instead of staying in your normal routine. This makes you leave your comfort zone — and brilliant things happen when we step out of the expected.
  • Change your routine! Do you always approach things in the same way, do the same morning routine, have the same breakfast? Try doing things differently or out of order. See how that changes your perspective and gets you past the block.
  • Brainstorm differently. Do you keep a mental or physical list of ideas? Do you normally just do whatever pops into your head? Try brainstorming differently — such as mind maps, word clouds, flow charts, or drawing out ideas instead of listing them.
  • Doodle. Whether you write, draw, design, or anything else, try just closing your eyes and moving a pencil on paper. Let your mind relax and just draw whatever comes to you. This is a great way to get out of your head.
  • Write by hand! We type a LOT. We use computers and devices for everything. Try brainstorming or writing by hand and feel how different that is from typing.
  • Rearrange your workspace. Try rearranging the furniture or changing out the art on the walls of your workspace. If you don’t have space or time to move furniture, try rearranging the stuff on your desk and reorganizing your desk drawers. Change your space, change your perspective.

Do any of these ideas work for you? Let me know!


Check out my book Concept to Conclusion: How to Write a Book and learn everything you need to know to conceive of, outline, write, publish, and market a book! Or maybe you want something lighthearted and great for kids? I just published a brand new children’s book called I Love You Bigger Than All The Stars In The Sky and it is garnering very positive reviews!!

Sign up for my mailing list for writing and freelancing news and information.

Other stories you may like:

Freelance Business Coaching — What is it & why should you care?

Freelance Business Coaching — What is it & why should you care?

JS, Medium

I get so many questions from new and aspiring freelancers — especially surrounding how to find and get clients, how to determine or raise prices, and how to “break up” with clients. Typically, I take the time to thoroughly write out an answer for each one, whether it’s on Quora, Facebook writing/freelancing groups, comments on my blog, or through email.

While I do still intend to write a guidebook of sorts for beginning freelancers with pitch examples, writing samples, scripts, contract templates, etc., I think doing one-on-one freelance business coaching is really helpful for people who want one-on-one help, advice, and accountability with a real person.

After all, having someone to answer questions, give direction and actionable steps to take, and hold you accountable may help you get more done!

I’ve been doing book coaching and free freelancing mentoring for several years now, and this felt like the perfect next step.

What is freelance coaching?

Great question! It’s basically interchangeable with career or business coaching — just focused specifically on freelancing.

It’s me as an expert, coach, and mentor to someone looking to start freelancing or for freelancers who want to level up and streamline their business.

Basically, if you want to start a side hustle as a freelancer selling your services or create a full-time freelance career, I can help!

Services include:

  • Deciding if you need a niche, and if so refining your niche
  • Marketing yourself and finding clients
  • Helping you pitch yourself to potential clients
  • How to determine your pricing/rates
  • How to negotiate rates with potential clients
  • How to raise your rates with existing clients
  • Time management and organization
  • Learning to identify “bad” clients/red flags and say no before ever starting to work with them
  • How to “break up” with a client you no longer want to work with
  • Helping you come up with copy for your website and write a bio
  • Free access to a contract template
  • Recommending free or low-cost tools and software that make your job easier (no affiliate links, no kickbacks, not required to use — just recommendations)

And more!

What do you think?

Are there services missing that you would find useful? Drop them in the comments and I can add them to the list!

Questions for YOU

Have you ever worked with a coach? What were your biggest positives and negatives when working with one?

Was there something that REALLY worked for you — or something that really, really didn’t and disappointed you?

I’d love to hear about YOUR experiences with coaches as the client and whether the coaching was “worth it” for you — or what would MAKE it worth it.

Thank you for your help!


Check out my book Concept to Conclusion: How to Write a Bookand learn everything you need to know to conceive of, outline, write, publish, and market a book!

Sign up for my mailing list for writing and freelancing news and information.


Other stories you may like:

The Tools That Run My Business

One Fast & Simple Way to Scale Your Freelance Business

Should You Start a Blog?